VIRTUAL: Robert Rotberg in conversation with John Campbell

Join us for a fascinating discussion between Africa experts Robert Rotberg and John Campbell about Robert's book Things Come Together: Africans Achieving Greatness in the Twenty-first Century!  Register for this Zoom webinar here.

About Africans Achieving Greatness:

For decades, Africa was falling apart. But now it is coming together, and Africans are achieving greatness. Despite the advances, though, the twenty-first century brings challenges to match each and every major opportunity. In Things Come Together, Robert Rotberg brings all of contemporary Africa into a single volume, extolling the successes and explaining the struggles. Rotberg is one of the world's foremost authorities on African politics and society, and in this book he synthesizes his knowledge of the continent into a concise overview of the current state of Africa and where it is likely headed.

To that end, Rotberg considers Africa's myriad peoples. The continent is currently experiencing explosive population growth and rapid urbanization. How well are African states managing this epochal shift? He looks at how Africa's nations are governed, ranging from states with autocratic kleptocrats to democratized regimes that have made progress in achieving economic growth and battling corruption. He then turns to African economies, looking at growth levels, productivity, and persistent corruption. He concludes by filling in the picture, covering the effects of war, health care, wildlife management, varieties of religious belief, education, technology diffusion, and the character of both city and village life in this ever-evolving region.

Throughout this sweeping work, Rotberg deftly moves readers across the continent, from Nigeria to South Africa, from Kenya to Senegal, to name a few. While there are undeniable cross-continental commonalities related to governance, demographics, and economic performance, he shows the unique variations of who and what is African. For anyone interested in reading a comprehensive yet pithy synthesis of a vast region possessing the world's fastest-growing population, this book is the ideal introduction.

Robert I. Rotberg is President Emeritus of the World Peace Foundation and Founding Director of Harvard Kennedy School's Program on Intrastate Conflict. He was professor of political science and history at MIT, Academic Vice President of Tufts University, and President of Lafayette College. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has published a number of books and article on Africa, Asia, Latin America, and writes extensively for American, Canadian, and overseas newspapers. He has lived and worked extensively throughout Africa.

About Nigeria and the Nation-State:

Nigeria matters. It is Africa's largest economy, and it is projected to become the third most populous country in the world by 2050, but its democratic aspirations are challenged by rising insecurity. John Campbell traces the fractured colonial history and contemporary ethnic conflicts and political corruption that define Nigeria today. It was not--and never had been--a nation-state like those of Europe. It is still not quite a nation because Nigerians are not yet united by language, religion, culture, or a common national story. It is not quite a state because the government is weak and getting weaker, beset by Islamist terrorism, insurrection, intercommunal violence, and a countrywide crime wave. This deeply knowledgeable book is an antidote to those who would make the mistakes of Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq--mistakes based on misunderstanding--in Nigeria. Up to now, such mistakes have largely been avoided, but Nigeria will soon--and Campbell argues already does--require much greater attention by the West.

John Campbell is the Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, DC. He is the author of the upcoming book Nigeria and the Nation-State: Rethinking Diplomacy with the Postcolonial World, set for publication in December 2020, and writes the blog Africa in Transition. From 1975 to 2007, Campbell served as a U.S. Department of State Foreign Service officer. He served twice in Nigeria, as political counselor from 1988 to 1990, and as ambassador from 2004 to 2007. Campbell's additional overseas postings include Lyon, Paris, Geneva, and Pretoria. He also served as deputy assistant secretary for human resources, dean of the Foreign Service Institute's School of Language Studies, and director of the Office of UN Political Affairs.

Event date: 

Tuesday, December 15, 2020 - 7:00pm

Event address: 

VIRTUAL

Ticketed Event: 

No
Things Come Together: Africans Achieving Greatness in the Twenty-First Century Cover Image
$27.95
ISBN: 9780190942540
Availability: Available from Warehouse
Published: Oxford University Press, USA - August 10th, 2020

For decades, Africa was falling apart. But now it is coming together, and Africans are achieving greatness. Despite the advances, though, the twenty-first century brings challenges to match each and every major opportunity. In Things Come Together, Robert Rotberg brings all of contemporary Africa into a single volume, extolling the successes and explaining the struggles.


Nigeria and the Nation-State: Rethinking Diplomacy with the Postcolonial World (Council on Foreign Relations Book) Cover Image
$39.15
ISBN: 9781538113752
Availability: Available from Warehouse
Published: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers - December 2nd, 2020

Nigeria matters. It is Africa's largest economy, and it is projected to become the third most populous country in the world by 2050, but its democratic aspirations are challenged by rising insecurity. John Campbell traces the fractured colonial history and contemporary ethnic conflicts and political corruption that define Nigeria today.


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Age Group(s): 

Adult (19 - Boomer)

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