VIRTUAL: Page Dickey in conversation with Bill Noble

Event date: 
Tuesday, October 13, 2020 - 7:00pm

Join us for a conversation about gardening and transitions, between Page Dickey and Bill Noble, about Page's new book, Uprooted: A Gardener Reflects on Beginning AgainClick here to register for this Zoom event.

About Uprooted:

When Page Dickey moved away from her celebrated garden at Duck Hill, she left a landscape she had spent thirty-four years making, nurturing, and loving. She found her next chapter in northwestern Connecticut, on 17 acres of rolling fields and woodland around a former Methodist church. In Uprooted, celebrated garden writer Page Dickey reflects on this transition and on what it means for a gardener to start again.

In these pages, fol­low her journey: searching for a new home, discovering the ins and outs of the landscape surround­ing her new garden, establishing the garden, and learning how to be a different kind of gardener. The sur­prise at the heart of the book? Although Dickey was sad to leave her beloved garden, she found herself thrilled to begin a new garden in a wilder, larger landscape.
 
Written with humor and elegance, Uprooted is an endearing story about transitions—and the satisfaction and joy that new horizons can bring.

Page Dickey is a garden designer and author of multiple books, including Gardens in the Spiritof PlaceInside Out, and Embroidered Ground. She lectures around the country about plants and garden design, and has written articles for House and GardenArchitectural DigestHorticultureFine Gardening, and Garden Design. Her former garden, Duck Hill, has been featured in the New York Times, Elle Décor, and Vogue. She now lives and gardens in Falls Village, Connecticut, on 17 acres with a view of the Berkshire hills.

About Spirit of Place:

How does an individual garden relate to the larger landscape? How does it connect to the natural and cultural environment? Does it evoke a sense of place? In Spirit of Place, Bill Noble—a lifelong gardener, and the former director of preservation for the Garden Conservancy—helps gardeners answer these questions by sharing how they influenced the creation of his garden in Vermont.

Throughout, Noble reveals that a garden is never created in a vacuum but is rather the outcome of an individual’s personal vision combined with historical and cultural forces. Sumptuously illustrated, this thoughtful look at the process of garden-making shares insights gleaned over a long career that will inspire you to create a garden rich in context, personal vision, and spirit.

For 25 years Bill Noble has worked as a garden design and professional in garden preservation. As Director of Preservation for the Garden Conservancy, he was instrumental in the preservation and restoration of dozens of gardens throughout the United States. The insights gained from the gardens and gardeners he has worked with are reflected in his own garden in Norwich, Vermont, which is included in the Smithsonian Institution’s Archive of American Gardens and has been featured in Martha Stewart Living, House & Garden, the New York Times, and Outstanding American Gardens.

Event address: 
VIRTUAL
Ticketed Event: 
No
Books: 
Uprooted: A Gardener Reflects on Beginning Again Cover Image
$27.95
ISBN: 9781604699579
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Timber Press - September 22nd, 2020

"An intimate, lesson-filled story of what happens when one of America’s best-known garden writers transplants herself, rooting in to a deeper partnership with nature than ever before." —Margaret Roach, author of A Way to Garden

When Page Dickey moved away from her celebrated garden at Duck Hill, she left a landscape she had spent thirty-four years


Spirit of Place: The Making of a New England Garden Cover Image
$35.00
ISBN: 9781604698503
Availability: Available from Warehouse
Published: Timber Press - June 23rd, 2020

“Delve into this beautiful book. You’ll come away sharing his passion for the beauty that gardens bring into our lives.” —Sigourney Weaver, environmentalist, actor, trustee of New York Botanical Garden

How does an individual garden relate to the larger landscape? How does it connect to the natural and cultural environment?


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Age Group(s): 
Adult (19 - Boomer)